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cupola & annecy – again!

I’ve ushered in 2020 by reknitting two of my own designs!  Hats, to me, are just about the perfect project: portable, quick, a canvas for infinite creativity, and something that everybody needs.

First up: my Annecy Beret.

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Originally published 8 years ago in collaboration with the Independent Designers’ Program at Knit Picks, it was time for this design to be remade in a current yarn.  I’ve worked with KP’s City Tweed DK-weight yarn before for my Stomping Grounds sweater, but never its heavier aran-weight sibling.  And just like the DK-weight, this yarn is wonderful to work with: a soft hand while knitting, colorways that have just the right amount of tweed, and a lovely, drapey fabric after blocking that makes it ideal for so many projects.

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(I think this photo shows the squishiness and drape of the beret best.  And it’s also the cover shot for my band’s next album HA!  Kidding.)

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I was lucky enough to work with one of the newest colors to the line, “Snowbank,” which is a pure white tweed.  It’s elegant, both classic and chic, and pairs nicely with just about any neutral.  I think you’ll really love this update to Annecy, which you can find at Knit Picks here, on Ravelry here, and on my website here.

Next up: my Cupola hat.

The original hat, which I featured in only my last post here at DCD, was worked in the most wonderful gray tweed yarn, Valley Yarns Taconic, a blend of Merino wool and cashmere.  That hat lives happily with the folks at WEBS now, so I wanted to remake the hat for myself.

Recently, I’ve been focused on significantly reducing my yarn “stash,” donating much of it to a local handiwork group.  The yarn I have kept is (a) still being produced by its manufacturer (a critical detail for any independent designer); (b) in solid or mostly solid colors that enhance my vision for the stitches/fabric; and (c) frankly, in the words of Marie Kondo, still “sparking joy” for me!

So, as part of my stashdown2020 effort, I found a few remaining skeins of Hudson yarn by Jill Draper Makes Stuff in the most vibrant green, aptly named “Bottle.”  (I had originally used my skeins to make a Rhinecliff hat for Nina when she was only about 4 months old!)

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The color and stitch definition of this hat most definitely spark joy!  (And so did this photoshoot.  I love how my rainbow sweater pairs so well with my new hat.)

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I am such a fan of this yarn.  Raised, produced, and dyed domestically, this 100% Merino wool produces a highly textured fabric with crisp stitches and great depth.

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I love the streamlined flow of this design, as the ribbing transforms into cables and transforms back into ribbing that merges together in the crown.  It’s a design that suits everyone in the family, hence the 3 different sizes in the pattern!  You can find the Cupola hat here at DCD, on Ravelry here, or at WEBS here (where you can create a lovely kit with your own choice of Taconic yarn!)

There’s still lots of knitting time left this Winter, so I hope it’s a productive and creative season for you!

xoxo Danielle

3 thoughts on “cupola & annecy – again!”

  1. These are both such delightful and creative designs, Danielle, that they make me smile!! Sparkling joy, indeed….a perfect description…!!!!

  2. Love this post! The Annecy Hat is just what I am looking for, and you wear it so well. I love that you used JDMS on the green one. She is local to me and I have knit many a Water Hat for flint in her wool. Can’t say enough good things about that. I am happy to have stumble upon your blog. Be well, and have peace in your day. Regina

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